General CA FAQ

 

General

If I have an issue who should I talk to?

That depends on what the issue is. The general hierarchy for dealing with issues is:

  • The lecturer/module co-ordinator
  • Your year head
  • The chair of the programme
  • The head of the school

If the issue related to a module you should first talk with the lecturer/module co-ordinator. If the issue relates to the whole year and not just a module then the first person to talk to is your year head. Issues that relate to the whole programme should, in the first instance, be discussed with the chair of the programme.

The current holders of the above roles are:

Year 1 & 2 Head   Ms. Jane Kernan
Year 3 Head   Dr. David Sinclair
Year 4 Head   Dr. Mark Humphrys
Chair of the Programme   Dr. Martin Crane
Head of the School   Dr. Mark Roantree & Dr. David Sinclair

But if you have an issue please talk to someone. Very few issues get resolved by ignoring them.

How do I keep in touch with the School, especially outside of semester 1 and 2?

You should frequently check:

What are ETCS credits?

For a full description of the ETCS system please see ETCS. Briefly, each module has ETCS credits assigned to it. Most modules have 5 ETCS credits, and some have 10 ETCS credits (there are 7.5 ETCS credit modules but these are on the taught Masters programmes). You can think of them as an indication of the amount of work we expect you to put into a module.

Module X has 5 ETCS credits and module Y has 10 ETCS credits, but I have to spend the same amount of time on each module. Is module X too hard?

The ETCS credits are just an indication. People differ. You may find one module easier than another whereas another classmate has the exact opposite experience. The effort we expect you to put into a module consists of:

  • lectures;
  • tutorials;
  • labratory sessions;
  • continuous assessment; and
  • self-directed study.

To answer the question above, is module X too hard? No, you are probably not spending enough time on module Y.


Deferrals & Extenuating Circumstances

What do I do if I know I will not be able to sit an exam?

You should seek a deferral of your exam by completing the (R33) Deferral Form.This form must be completed and submitted two weeks before the submission of assessment or examination date. After these dates should exceptional circumstances arise, you must complete an Extenuating Circumstances form (R-30) in order to have these considered by the Programme Chairperson/Progression and Award Board

Please read these forms carefully as it only applies in limited circumstances and require supplementary documentation. 

What happens if I am sick on the day of the exam or the day before?

If there are reasons outside your control, like a sudden illness, that you believe may have adversely affected your performance in an exam, please complete an Extenuating Circumstances form (R-30) in order to have these considered by the Programme Chairperson/Progression and Award Board.


Exam Results

My transcript has 32R for module X. What does that mean?

The 32 is the final module mark which is the weighted average of the exam mark and the continuous assessmnet mark. The R indicates that you have failed the exam component but passed the continuous assessment component. If you received this mark at the semester 1 or 2, then you need to repeat the exam in the resits in August. If you received this mark at the resits, then you need to repeat that module in the next academic year.

My transcript has 32S for module X. What does that mean?

The 32 is the final module mark which is the weighted average of the exam mark and the continuous assessmnet mark. The S indicates that you have failed the continuous assessment component but passed the exam component. You should contact the module co-ordinator immediately. What happens next depends on the module.

Some module offer repeat continuous assessment which you need to submit before the Resit examinations.

Some modules do not offer repeat continuous assessment.

  • If the continuous assessment is not deemed to be formative, then you need to repeat the exam, even though you have passed it, and achieve a mark in the exam that when combined with your existing failed continuous assessment mark results in a passing overall module mark.
  • If the continuous assessment is deemed to be formative, then you need to repeat the module in the next academic year.

My transcript has 32 for module X. What does that mean?

The 32 is the final module mark which is the weighted average of the exam mark and the continuous assessmnet mark. The absence of a R or S after the mark indicates that you have failed both the exam component and the continuous assessment component. Consult the previous 2 questions for what happens next.

My transcript has 37C for module X. What does that mean?

The 37 is the final module mark which is the weighted average of the exam mark and the continuous assessmnet mark. The C after the mark indicates that you have compensated that module and you do not need to repeat it.

My transcript has D for module X. What does that mean?

The D means that a deferral was granted for the module and that this attempt was not counted. So if this was your first attempt at the module and it is deferred, then your next attempt will be considered as your first attempt.

My transcript has I for module X. What does that mean?

The I means that a deferral on medical grounds was granted for the module and that this attempt was not counted. So if this was your first attempt at the module and it is deferred, then your next attempt will be considered as your first attempt.

How do I know what I have to repeat?

After the results are published you will receive a letter from the Registry informing you how to register for repeat exams.You will have to repeat the exam for any modules with a failed examination component. These modules will have a score below 40 followed by an R or no code at all, e.g. 32R or 32.

If you are unsure please contact the Faculty Office or the Chair of the Programme.

What are Consultation Days?

Two days shortly after exam marks are published are set aside as "consultation days". On consultation days, you may visit your lecturers, review your exam script and discuss your performance with your lecturers. As, hopefully, many students will wish to review their scripts, you should make an appointment with your lecturer. It is highly recommended that you take up this opportunity, whether you passed or failed. Students who fail to review their exam scripts are effectively operating in the dark as to how best to improve their exam performance.
Consultation days are indicated in the DCU academic calendar as "PERIOD OF CONSULTATION FOR STUDENTS WITH FACULTY".

Consultation Days are not about remarking scripts. They are an opportunity for the lecturer and student to review the student's performance and to indicate where a student can improve.

What can I do if I am not happy with my mark?

Firstly, you should use the Consultation Days to discuss your script with the lecturer. They will explain why you got the mark you received and where you went wrong. If you are still unhappy after the consultation meeting you may lodge an appeal using the DCU Appeals Process. Please read the instructions that come with the Appeals Form very carefully as appeals must be lodged by a specific date. The grounds for an appeal are limited to the following.

  • Your performance in the assessment was adversely affected by illness or other factors which you was unable or, for valid reasons, unwilling to divulge before the Progression and Award Board reached its decision.
  • The Progression and Award Board did not give sufficient weight to any extenuating circumstances previously notified to the Registry prior to the holding of the meeting of the Progression and Award Board.
  • The examinations were not conducted in accordance with the current regulations as prescribed by the Programme Board and as approved by Academic Council.
  • There was a substantial error of judgement on the part of the Examiners.
  • There was a material administrative error or a material irregularity in assessment procedures which have made a real and substantial difference to the candidate's result; appeals lodged in this category may be made by a third party on behalf of one or more candidates provided that such appeals are made with the full and written consent of all the candidates concerned.

The accompanying notes with the R31 form also spell out what have been unsuccessful grounds for an Appeal. If you are basing your appeal on any of the following grounds you will be unsucessful.

  • I was hoping for a first.
  • I was disappointed in my result.
  • I had to work to earn money.
  • I was surprised at my result.

You may wish to discuss the grounds for your appeal with the Chair of the Programme prior to lodging your appeal. The Appeals Board will ask the Chair of the Programme for their opinion of the appeal. The Appeals Board is independent and will come to their own decision.


Compensation

What is Compensation?

Compensation allows you to progress if:

  • if your module mark is in the range [35-39];
  • it is your first complete set of marks of that year;
  • if the total ETCS credits for the compensating modules is 1/6 or less of the ETCS credits for that year;
  • if your precision year mark is ≥ 45; and
  • the module is not a non-compensatory module.

Is Compensation automatic?

No. Compensation is at the discretion of the Examinations Board.

Do I apply for Compensation?

No. Compensation is considered by the Examinations Board at its Progression & Awards Board meeting.


Progression

How do I complete an academic year?

You need to achieve a mark of 40% or better in all your contributing modules. In Years 1, 2 and 4 all modules are contributing modules. In year 3, all modules, except INTRA, are contributing modules. INTRA is a pass/fail module and is assessed after your have submitted your INTRA report.

How is the overall year mark calculated?

The overall year mark, called the Precision Mark, is the weighted average (based on ETCS credits) of the contributing modules at their first attempt.

If I resit/repeat a module is the new mark used to calculate my year mark?

No. Your overall year mark is calculated from the first attempt at the contributing modules.

How do I pass INTRA?

You pass INTRA by:

  • getting a satisfactory INTRA Tutor Visit Report (supplied by your INTRA Tutor);
  • getting a satisfactory Employer's Evaluation Report (supplied by the employer); and
  • submitting a satisfactory INTRA Report (supplied by you).

Has anyone ever failed INTRA?

Yes.

As a CASE4 student can I register for 4 semester 1 options and 2 semester 2 options?

No. If you case a CASE4 student you must register for 3 semester 1 options and 3 semester 2 options.


Classification

How is the year classification determined?

Your year classification is based on your Precision Mark once you have passed (or compensated) all modules.

  • H1: ≥ 70%
  • H2.1: 60% to 69%
  • H2.2: 50% to 59%
  • H3: ≤ 49%

If your Precision Mark is between 69.5% and 69.99% you will receive a H1. Similar rules apply at the H2.1, H2.2 and H3 boundaries.

If your Precision Mark is between 69.0% and 69.49% and ETCS credits for modules in which you have a marks of 70% or greater are greater then or equal to half the total ETCS credits for the year, then you will be awarded a H1. Similar rules apply at the H2.1, H2.2 and H3 boundaries.

How is my degree classification determined?

For this academic year your degree classification is based solely on your Year 4 Precision Mark.

Starting in the academic year 2011-2012 your degree classification will be based on 85% of your Year 4 Precision Mark and 15% of your Year 3 Precision Mark. Yes! Year 3 counts.


If you have any other topics you would like addressed here please email me.

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